Mary Foley Real Estate Inc.
Mary Foley Real Estate Inc.


Posted by Mary Foley Real Estate Inc. on 5/22/2018

As a homeowner, you're constantly faced with a variety of spending decisions, many of which could improve the quality of your life or just put a strain on your budget. The challenge is to monitor your cash flow, anticipate your family's needs, and avoid spending more than you can afford. There's a goal that's much easier said than done! Although managing one's budget is based on personal priorities and financial resources, it's often useful to consider feedback and perspectives from other homeowners. The following thoughts are based on the experiences of one such homeowner.

  • Tool sheds are not an absolute necessity for most people, but they can be extremely helpful in protecting your yard equipment and keeping your property looking neat. If you own a riding mower, for example, there may not be space in your garage to store it. For those who own a backyard swimming pool, a shed can be very useful for storing pool chemicals, maintenance equipment, and pool toys. While a tool shed can set you back a few hundred dollars or more, getting one on your property will make your yard look nicer and keep your tools, chemicals, and machinery in a safer, more secure place.
  • Many people are aware that a basement dehumidifier can remove excess moisture and help prevent the growth of mold. This is especially important if you're storing anything of value in your basement, such as old books, important documents, clothing, framed art, or collectables. Since basement humidifiers vary in price from a couple hundred dollars to well over $1,000, some homeowners postpone buying them. However, when you factor in the potential cost of mold remediation and having to throw away belongings that get damaged by moisture and mold, the cost is much more justifiable. If you're fortunate enough to have a dry basement with a humidity level of less than 50%, then a dehumidifier may be an unnecessary purchase. If you want to be sure, though, you can buy a cheap humidity gauge for $10 or $20 -- either online or at a local hardware store.
  • A ceiling fan may seem like a frivolous expense for a screened in porch, but you'll be mighty glad you have one on hot, humid days! You might think that large window screens would provide ample circulation for an outdoor porch, but unless there's a breeze -- either natural or man made -- then that hot air will often just sit there and linger, much like a guest who has overstayed their welcome! A ceiling fan can pull that uncomfortable air away from you and stir up some much-needed circulation. Ceiling fans, which typically cost between $100 and $200 (plus installation) -- create both the look and feel of a cool, breezy environment. They also help reduce air conditioning costs inside your home.
Since everyone's personal needs, budgets, and lifestyles are different, there are a lot of factors that come into play when deciding whether to purchase (or postpone) any of these three items. Hopefully, this blog post has provided you with some helpful insights on making those decisions!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mary Foley Real Estate Inc. on 5/15/2018

You may have the notion as you’re searching for a house that the first bid will win when it comes to jumping at the chance to buy a home. That’s not always true. however, can waiting too long to put in an offer on a home be detrimental to your home search? We’ll go over some of the best advice as to what makes a good offer, and when the best time to put that offer in is.  


There’s actually no real set timeline for when you should put an offer in on a home. The real determination of this is the type of housing market that we’re in in at any particular time. A fast moving housing market can equate to the need for you to make an offer quickly. Most realtors will agree that you shouldn't wait too long to put in an offer on a home that you like. 


If you have a good realtor, and you have done your homework as well, you’ll be able to make an educated offer. You’ll have done your due diligence if you have a pre-approval letter ready and understand a bit about the market itself, along with the pricing typical of the neighborhood where you’re interested in buying. Your realtor can help you to understand as to whether the offer you want to put in is a good one or not. 


Know What You Want


The most important part of putting in an offer on a home is knowing what you want in a  home. Before you get to the point where you actually want to put in offers, it’s a good idea to have searched a bit online, and even attended a few open houses in the area where you’re searching. This will give you a better idea of what’s out there in your price range.     


The First Offer Is The Best One


This is an old adage in the real estate business. If you’re a seller, you have to assume that what a buyer is offering is their top number. If other offers come in at a higher price, then buyers who were really interested in the home may be fresh out of luck. That’s why putting in a strong offer is so important. You don’t want to lose out on a home that you really want because you haven’t taken the time to understand what a good price point for a home in your neighborhood of choice is.


New Listings Have More Interest


Homes that have just been listed generate the most enthusiasm. Sometimes, the biggest part of putting an offer in on a home is trial and error. Many people will put in 2 to 3 offers before they finally secure the home of their dreams. Newer listings typically expect more for the price point the house is listed at. If a home has been listed for a short time, buyers can expect to pay close to the asking price for the home. Homes that have been on the market for a longer period of time have more negotiating power, giving the buyer a bit more wiggle room in their offer.  

The bottom line is that if you see a home that you love, you’ll want to put an offer in as soon as possible. When the market is hot, no home will last long. Be prepared to make an offer when you find that property you want so that the process will be a lot easier for you.  






Posted by Mary Foley Real Estate Inc. on 5/10/2018

Beautiful Bridle Cross Townhouse. This townhouse has a walkout basement and abuts the woods. Great open floor plan with tons of natural light. Upgraded kitchen with stainless appliances upgraded cabinets and counter tops. Slider to deck for outdoor relaxation. Living room with gas fire place to keep you cozy in the winter! Beautiful hardwood floors throughout the first floor. Central air for those warm summer days. Great layout on the second floor with bedrooms laundry and an awesome huge bathroom. Bathroom has jetted tub, stand alone shower, and double vanity. Lower level has great finished family room with slider for outside access. This one won't last. Call today to schedule your showing!

More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts





Posted by Mary Foley Real Estate Inc. on 5/10/2018

This Adorable Colonial is not to be missed! Downsizing or Just Starting Out. This is a great alternative to condo living at a great price and no condo fees!! Great big fenced in back yard, with a huge deck for those summer barbeques! French doors off the dining area make outdoor access a breeze. Kitchen appliances that are less than a year old. Updated Counter Tops and Floors! So much natural light in this home, making it extra inviting. This one won't last, Call today for your showing before it's gone!!

More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts





Posted by Mary Foley Real Estate Inc. on 5/8/2018

Once you start the process of buying a home, you may begin to feel as if you know everything there is to know about real estate. There’s so much house hunting, researching and negotiating that the process can be dizzying. Once you get into a contract and start the home inspection process, a whole new host of questions comes to the table. Now, you need to know the nitty gritty of what you’re about to buy. 


Once you hire a home inspector, it could seem like they are speaking an entirely different language. These inspectors will be looking for any and all potential problems with your new dream home. In order to get the most out of your home inspection, you’ll want to ask smart questions.


How Much Of An Impact Does This Have?


Home inspectors cannot legally tell you whether a property is “good” or not. They can only tell you the things they find wrong with the property, or where they see a need for improvement. These inspectors will seem pretty even keeled when you meet them, so they can be hard to read. They’re all about facts. Asking them what kind of an impact a certain problem will have can help you to make a more informed decision. 



Who Can Fix This?


In many states, home inspectors cannot legally make repair recommendations. They can however give you an idea of how easy or how complicated it may be to fix something. You may find that you’ll be able to make simple repairs on your own rather than hire someone for a big price. The only drawback is that home inspectors cannot actually “fix” anything for you. They can only give advice.  


What’s A Priority?


Your home inspector can give you an idea of what issues in the home you are about to buy need to be fixed first. Since the inspector's job is to point out absolutely everything- both big and small- you’ll want to know what has the biggest priority so that you can plan accordingly. If things are at the “end of their lifetime” rather than in need of a simple repair, you’ll understand as a homebuyer how much money you’ll need to shell out for repairs sooner rather than later.   


Where Is That?


Many times as home inspectors as heading through the property, mentioning things that need repairs and attention, you may have no idea what they are referring to. It’s a good idea to have a notepad and and a camera so that you can refer back to what the inspector was talking about. Some inspectors even insert digital pictures into their reports, so you can ask about that when you’re hiring an inspector.   

How Does That Work?


Inspectors can often give you an idea of how different moving parts of the home operate. If you’re new to homeownership, or come across something that you have never seen before, your inspector will be happy to help you figure it all out. It can be a lifesaver once you move in since you’ll already know how much of the house operates.